While BIXI Files For Bankruptcy Rugged Cycles Deploys North America’s Largest University Bike Share Solution!

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https://www.facebook.com/TAMUSustainability

Rugged Cycles deployed a 300 bike bike share system with seven stations in the summer of 2013! This winter the system is expected to expand to 500 bikes. I am sure that this is the largest University bike share program, in fact it is probably the largest bike share program in the State of Texas – and you know how they like everything BIG in Texas!!

Check out the website: www.maroonbikeshare.com 

It maybe time for the City of Vancouver to take a look at the investment they made into the Helmet/bike share system locally built by the SandVault Group!

http://www.insidevancouver.ca/2014/01/28/vancouver-bike-sharing-program-faces-speedbump/

SandVault’s equipment has been the only profitable bike share system that I know about, deployed in Miami Beach. Take a look at Vancouver’s local public bike share equipment supplier: www.sandvault.com

Helmet Dispencer and how to use.

About these ads

Deco Bike Share in Miami Beach – Second Best Bike Share System in the United States?

Capital Bike share (2nd year) Deco Dashboard (almost two years. Deco 2nd year

Here is a great article on why Capital Bike Share is the best in the United States:

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/doers/2013/01/capital_bikeshare_how_paul_demaio_gabe_klein_adrian_fenty_and_other_dc_leaders.html

But lets look at the facts and compare the two most popular bike share solutions in the United States:

In terms of size, ridership, and financial viability—is in Washington, D.C. How
did D.C. accomplish this unlikely task?

1. Funding (Financial Viability):

Miami Beach: Paid for by Deco Bike

Washington DC: Paid for by US tax payers

2. Rides in the first two years (Ridership):

Miami Beach: 2,153,350

Washington DC: 1,851,857

3. Members (both annual and walk up):

Miami Beach: 600,000+

Washington DC: 270,000

4. Size:

Miami Beach: 100 Stations

Washington DC: 189 Stations

After the second try at a bike share solution, Washington DC has done a great job building and implementing Capital Bike Share. Deco Bike in Miami – second best bike share system in the United States?

New York City with 10,000 bikes and a sponsor of 30+ million dollars will be taking the crown away from Washington.

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SandVault System Works After Flooding!

There is a reason why we run all wiring 3' off the ground.

There is a reason why we run all wiring 3′ off the ground.

 

Not all cities have to deal with flooding, however this is something to consider for some locations.

There is a method to the design by the SandVault Group!

Nicole Freedman, Changing the Worst Bike City – Public Bike Share is it!

 

Nicaole-Freeman

Nicole Freedman the “Bike Czar” in Boston promotes public bike share and how it is transforming the City of Boston.

http://inhabitat.com/video-boston-bike-czar-nicole-freedman-talks-bike-share-urban-cycling/

metro article

Integrated Helmet Dispenser with Public Bike Share!

metro article

“Forget lugging a helmet around in case you fancy an impromptu ride when, or if, Vancouver gets a bike share system.

The city – set to decide later this spring whether to launch a bike share system with preferred vendor Portland-based Alta Bicycle Share – paid $50,000 to Richmond-based SandVault Group Global Solutions Corp. to develop a prototype of a bike helmet distribution machine.

In just 41 days after the city awarded SandVault the contract in November, it built a noggin-protecting prototype that it showed off to Metro on Thursday.

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SandVault’s helmet dispensing machine. (Metro/Jennifer Gauthier)

Using the solar powered machine was as easy as swiping a card, selecting a size and style on a keypad and removing a helmet from a dispenser that’s integrated with a bike system.

“If you want to wear a helmet, there’s a helmet right there,” business development manager Derrick Moennick said. “It should be as easy as possible.”

The helmets are equipped with radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags so when users drop them off they are “quarantined” and not rented out until they are cleaned and checked for safety. Maintenance crews would sanitize the helmets as part of the system’s operating cost, which the city has previously pegged at about $1.9 million annually.

In Melbourne, the city’s helmet law led to lukewarm adoption of its bike share system, as helmets there must be purchased at retail locations or from vending machines. Alta told Metro in June it was working on an integrated system to avoid the mistakes made in Australia.

While Vancouver awarded the prototype contract to SandVault, it is still exploring various options and suppliers for helmet distribution, according to director of transportation Jerry Dobrovolny.

SandVault, which operates the world’s only non-subsidized bike share at tourist hotspot Miami Beach, applied to operate Vancouver’s bike share system but lost to Alta.

The company also built systems in Long Beach, Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Golden, B.C. and will soon launch one in Sao Paulo. Its technology is still operational after Hurricane Sandy slammed into the N.Y. operations.

“It’s important for government to support local industries that employ people and produce exports,” company owner Richard Murray said.” – Metronews.ca

http://metronews.ca/news/vancouver/561426/sneak-peek-at-vancouver-bike-shares-helmet-vending-machine-prototype/

HEINEKEN LAUNCHES THE MURAL PROJECT IN PARTNERSHIP DECOBIKE

DecoBike Partners with sponsor Heineken for the Mural Project in Miami.

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http://www.decobike.com/blog/

Heineheine

Heinehttp://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2012/12/09/us/20121208-WYNWOOD-8.html

Mineta Transportation Institute – Public Bike Share Study

Please have a look at this North American Public Bikesharing report!!

http://publicbikeshare.com/community/feasibility-studies/

Public bikesharing—the shared use of a bicycle fleet—is an innovative transportation strategy that has recently emerged in major North American cities. Information technology (IT)-based bikesharing systems typically position bicycles throughout an urban environment, among a network of docking stations, for immediate access. Trips can be one-way, round-trip, or both, depending on the operator. Bikesharing can serve as both a first-and-last mile (connector to other modes) and a many-mile solution. As of January 2012, 15 IT-based, public bikesharing systems were operating in the United States, with a total of 172,070 users and 5,238 bicycles. Four IT-based programs in Canada had a total of 44,352 users and 6,235 bicycles.

This study evaluates public bikesharing in North America, reviewing the advances in technology and major events during its rapid expansion. We conducted 14 interviews with industry experts, public officials, and governmental agencies in the United States and Canada during summer 2011/spring 2012 and interviewed all 19 IT-based bikesharing organizations in the United States and Canada in spring 2012. Several bikesharing insurance experts were also consulted in spring 2012. Notable developments during this period include the emergence of a close partnership between vendor and operator and technological advances, such as mobile bike-docking stations that can be moved to different locations and real-time bike/station tracking to facilitate system rebalancing and provide user information.

During fall 2011 and early 2012, we also completed a user survey (n=10,661) to obtain information on four early IT-based systems: BIXI in Montreal; BIXI in Toronto; Capital Bikeshare in Washington, D.C.; and Nice Ride Minnesota in the Twin Cities (Minneapolis and Saint Paul). The survey found that the most common trip purpose for bikesharing is commuting to either work or school. Not surprisingly, respondents in all cities indicated that they increased bicycling as a result of bikesharing. Respondents in the denser cities generally stated that they walked and rode bus and rail less, while in the Twin Cities, respondents reported that they walked and rode rail more but rode the bus slightly less. These shifts may be a function of city size and density, as open-access bicycles can more quickly and easily serve riders on congested transportation networks. Respondents in all cities overwhelmingly indicated that they drive less as a result of bikesharing, indicating that it reduces vehicle miles/kilometers traveled and vehicle emissions.” – http://transweb.sjsu.edu/PDFs/research/1029-public-bikesharing-understanding-early-operators-users.pdf

New York Demonstration

8D Technologies Sues BiXi Bike Share for 26 Million – New York, Chattanooga and San Francisco Deployments Delayed

Let me get this correct. PBSC has to sell the export side of the company because Bergeron’s report pointed out that under the city’s charter, it has no legal right to be involved in a commercial enterprise, they have a 108 million dollar loan guarantee from the City of Montreal, the original technology provider is now suing the company for 26 million dollars  – - so does this mean the potential owners of the system would now have a 26 million dollar lawsuit to contend with?

How will this affect the future of the 10,000 bike system going into New York, the 3000 bike system going into Chicago, let alone the pilot program in San Fransisco and other pending systems? If this doesn’t bring a little uncertainty to city officials nothing will, maybe more than just Montreal tax payers will be on the hook for the popular bike share system?

Few people know that it is 8D Technologies that developed the core technological solution that powers the BIXI bike-sharing system, which in turn has greatly contributed to the worldwide reputation and recognized success of the system, which is currently deployed, using 8D’s technological solution, in a dozen cities on three continents.

8D’s wireless, solar-powered 8D BSS (Bike Sharing System) technological solution primarily contains the following hardware and software components, which were conceptualized and are owned by 8D Technologies: the payment terminals (designed by Québécois industrial designer Michel Dallaire), electronic boards (for the terminal and bike docks), a comprehensive back office software solution that fully addresses the management and operational needs of the bike-sharing schemes regarding payments, operations management, accounts, billings, subscriptions and payments, power control (solar energy), user interaction, communication between bike docks and payment terminals, configuration, monitoring and operations. From a services point of view, 8D manages the majority of the bike-sharing schemes in the cities around the world, from its installations in Montreal, the hosting services being part of the solution it provides. 8D also created the Spotcycle mobile application for iPhone, BlackBerry Android, and the Spotcycle Web application.”

http://www.newswire.ca/en/story/964029/8d-technologies-historical-partner-of-the-bixi-tm-project-files-a-26-million-lawsuit-against-pbsc

“Montreal’s auditor general says the city missed several crucial steps in the creation and management of the Bixi bike-sharing program.

In a report released Monday, Auditor General Jacques Bergeron said the city didn’t properly study the program’s feasibility before its launch. He also said the city it has no authority to market and export the concept, and the Bixi service will cost taxpayers millions for years to come.

Bergeron wrote in his report that basic elements of management were neglected, including risk and cost-benefit analyses, and allowance for a financial margin of error.

In May, city council approved a $108-million bailout package for the program, including $37-million to cover Bixi’s deficit, and another $71-million in loan guarantees to export and develop the system abroad.

Exporting the concept is a major source of income for the program.

But Bergeron’s report pointed out that under the city’s charter, it has no legal right to be involved in a commercial enterprise.”

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/story/2011/06/20/bixi-report-mtl.html

What does a core technology change for BiXi mean?

Please comment if any of this information is incorrect.