Deco Bike Share in Miami Beach – Second Best Bike Share System in the United States?

Capital Bike share (2nd year) Deco Dashboard (almost two years. Deco 2nd year

Here is a great article on why Capital Bike Share is the best in the United States:

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/doers/2013/01/capital_bikeshare_how_paul_demaio_gabe_klein_adrian_fenty_and_other_dc_leaders.html

But lets look at the facts and compare the two most popular bike share solutions in the United States:

In terms of size, ridership, and financial viability—is in Washington, D.C. How
did D.C. accomplish this unlikely task?

1. Funding (Financial Viability):

Miami Beach: Paid for by Deco Bike

Washington DC: Paid for by US tax payers

2. Rides in the first two years (Ridership):

Miami Beach: 2,153,350

Washington DC: 1,851,857

3. Members (both annual and walk up):

Miami Beach: 600,000+

Washington DC: 270,000

4. Size:

Miami Beach: 100 Stations

Washington DC: 189 Stations

After the second try at a bike share solution, Washington DC has done a great job building and implementing Capital Bike Share. Deco Bike in Miami – second best bike share system in the United States?

New York City with 10,000 bikes and a sponsor of 30+ million dollars will be taking the crown away from Washington.

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SandVault System Works After Flooding!

There is a reason why we run all wiring 3' off the ground.

There is a reason why we run all wiring 3′ off the ground.

 

Not all cities have to deal with flooding, however this is something to consider for some locations.

There is a method to the design by the SandVault Group!

Nashville Deploys Public Bike Share

“Mayor Karl Dean, Metro Health Director Bill Paul and Tom Turner, CEO and president of the Nashville Downtown Partnership, demonstrated the program by checking out B-cycle bikes from an automated kiosk at the city’s Public Square, then rode to the Nashville Farmer’s Market and return the bikes to a kiosk there.

“Nashville B-cycle is one more way that we can make Nashville a more bike-friendly city and inspire people to embrace healthy, active living,” Dean said. “The strategically located kiosks will make getting around our urban core even easier and more convenient for workers, residents and visitors.”

 

http://www.newschannel5.com/story/20334698/dean-launches-downtown-bicycle-sharing-program?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

 

Mineta Transportation Institute – Public Bike Share Study

Please have a look at this North American Public Bikesharing report!!

http://publicbikeshare.com/community/feasibility-studies/

Public bikesharing—the shared use of a bicycle fleet—is an innovative transportation strategy that has recently emerged in major North American cities. Information technology (IT)-based bikesharing systems typically position bicycles throughout an urban environment, among a network of docking stations, for immediate access. Trips can be one-way, round-trip, or both, depending on the operator. Bikesharing can serve as both a first-and-last mile (connector to other modes) and a many-mile solution. As of January 2012, 15 IT-based, public bikesharing systems were operating in the United States, with a total of 172,070 users and 5,238 bicycles. Four IT-based programs in Canada had a total of 44,352 users and 6,235 bicycles.

This study evaluates public bikesharing in North America, reviewing the advances in technology and major events during its rapid expansion. We conducted 14 interviews with industry experts, public officials, and governmental agencies in the United States and Canada during summer 2011/spring 2012 and interviewed all 19 IT-based bikesharing organizations in the United States and Canada in spring 2012. Several bikesharing insurance experts were also consulted in spring 2012. Notable developments during this period include the emergence of a close partnership between vendor and operator and technological advances, such as mobile bike-docking stations that can be moved to different locations and real-time bike/station tracking to facilitate system rebalancing and provide user information.

During fall 2011 and early 2012, we also completed a user survey (n=10,661) to obtain information on four early IT-based systems: BIXI in Montreal; BIXI in Toronto; Capital Bikeshare in Washington, D.C.; and Nice Ride Minnesota in the Twin Cities (Minneapolis and Saint Paul). The survey found that the most common trip purpose for bikesharing is commuting to either work or school. Not surprisingly, respondents in all cities indicated that they increased bicycling as a result of bikesharing. Respondents in the denser cities generally stated that they walked and rode bus and rail less, while in the Twin Cities, respondents reported that they walked and rode rail more but rode the bus slightly less. These shifts may be a function of city size and density, as open-access bicycles can more quickly and easily serve riders on congested transportation networks. Respondents in all cities overwhelmingly indicated that they drive less as a result of bikesharing, indicating that it reduces vehicle miles/kilometers traveled and vehicle emissions.” – http://transweb.sjsu.edu/PDFs/research/1029-public-bikesharing-understanding-early-operators-users.pdf

Why Bike Sharing and Bicycling?

The US Conference of Mayors state  increasing bicycle use can:

 

Improve the environment by reducing the impact on residents of pollution and noise, limiting greenhouse gases, and improving the quality of public spaces.

Reduce congestion by shifting short trips (the majority of trips in cities) out of cars. This will also make cities more accessible for public transport, walking, essential car travel, emergency services, and deliveries.

Save lives by creating safer conditions for bicyclists and as a direct consequence improve the safety of all other road users. Research shows that increasing the number of bicyclists on the street improves bicycle safety.

Increase opportunities for residents of all ages to participate socially and economically in the community, regardless income or ability. Greater choice of travel modes also increases independence, especially among seniors and children.

Boost the economy by creating a community that is an attractive destination for new residents, tourists and businesses.

Enhance recreational opportunities, especially for children, and further contribute to the quality of life in the community.

Save city funds by increasing the efficient use of public space, reducing the need for costly new road infrastructure, preventing crashes, improving the health of the community, and increasing the use of public transport.

Enhance public safety and security by increasing the number of “eyes on the street” and providing more options for movement in the event of emergencies, natural disasters, and major public events.

Improve the health and well-being of the population by promoting routine physical activity.

US Conference of Mayors, 2003.

Looking for Funding? FTA issued its “Final Policy Statement on the Eligibility of Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvements Under Federal Transit Law”

 

FTA issued its “Final Policy Statement on the Eligibility of Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvements Under Federal Transit Law” last week.

FTA agrees that bicycle sharing systems provide meaningful access to public transportation and help address the problem of the ‘‘first and last mile.’’ Moreover, bicycle sharing programs, like all forms of active transportation, provide numerous benefits, such as reduced carbon emissions and improved public health. Federal Transit Law limits the use of FTA funds for ‘‘public transportation.’’ Historically, FTA has not included ‘‘bicycle’’ within the definition of Policy Statement on the Eligibility of Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvements under Federal Transit Law, 74 FR 58679 (Nov. 13, 2009). ‘‘public transportation.’’ Therefore, while a grantee may use FTA funds to purchase aspects of a bicycle sharing system if those aspects are located near public transportation stops and stations, an FTA grantee may not use FTA funds to purchase bicycles, regardless of whether those bicycles comply with Federal Buy America requirements.

http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-08-19/pdf/2011-21273.pdf